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RazorStar

Historical QB Rankings

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90. Jim Everett (Los Angeles Rams 1986-1993, New Orleans Saints 1994-1996, San Diego Chargers 1997)
Rams and Saints
Career Record 66-93-0 (41.51%) 94th out of 102


Record in Games with Good Defense 46-22-0 (67.65%) 87th out of 102
Record in Games with Bad Defense 20-71-0 (21.98%) 83rd out of 102
Percentage of Games with Good Defense 68/159 (42.77%) 83rd out of 102 (-7)


Wins above Average Starter in a 16 Game Season (-0.602)

Image result for jim everett

Jim Everett is a case of a player who probably held onto his career way too long despite having every reason to quit while he was ahead. He was the third overall draft pick by the Houston Oilers in 1986, but because they couldn't get a deal done, he started his career as a Ram. and his first 4-5 years were actually really good, making the playoffs in 3 of his first 4 seasons, the NFC Championship game in his 4th, and he managed to go to a pro bowl in 1990, despite the team selling off most of their players due to money issues. However, Everett was never the same guy after all the hard hits he took in the championship game against the 49ers, becoming very gun shy in the pocket and sack averse. He was benched a few times for guys you'll never hear about, traded to New Orleans (which is where QB's went to die historically), and eventually ended his career with the Chargers as a backup in 97. 

Perhaps the most famous thing he'll be remembered for was the time he attacked Jim Rome on air for being called Chris Everett. It was a classic insult in Rome's playbook, and Everett had warned him that things would get physical if he called him Chris again. Of course Jim did, he got a table flipped on him and shoved to the ground. Unfortunately, it made Rome popular for years, which sucked, but what can you do? Everett never had great teams around him, as you can see by his defense's ranking on this list but he wasn't good enough to overcome those poor performances. That's why he sits in the journeyman category despite a reasonable career.

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Rest in piss Jim Rome. Let's talk about someone most people wouldn't know.

 

89. Greg Landry (Detroit Lions 1968-1978, Baltimore Colts 1979-1981, Chicago Bears 1984)
2nd Place Lions QB
Careeer Record 44-50-3 (46.91%) 81st out of 102


Record in Games with Good Defense 32-15-2 (67.35%) 89th out of 102
Record in Games with Bad Defense 12-35-1 (26.04%) 59th out of 102
Percentage of Games with Good Defense 49/97 (50.52%) 62nd out of 102 (-27)


Wins Above Average Starter in a 16 Game Season (-0.586)

Image result for greg landry

 

Greg Landry was for a long time, the best thing to ever happen to the Lions at the quarterback position. They had been cursed with beyond terrible play at the position ever since Bobby Layne left them in 1958. And while it was true that the Lions were cursed to lose for 50 years, at least with Landry they lost far less than they usually did. In addition to being a decent passer, he was a quality running option as well, which was rare in the 70's, because scrambling QB's usually got decked. However he struggled with injuries and just barely got to the 90 starts mark needed to qualify for this list despite playing in the NFL for 15 years. Decent at best was the best the Lions could muster in his 11 years with them, and he only made a single playoff appearance, a game in which they lost 5-0 to the Cowboys. he played for the Colts for a few years as a backup to Bert Jones, before being released during the 1982 lockout. He spent a few years in the USFL before ending his career with the Chicago Bears. If he had just stayed on another year there he would have had a super bowl ring. Hahaha, but that's just how the dice fall for these guys.  

Edited by RazorStar

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This kind of illustrates how hard it is to find a good QB. This is 40 years of the 100 best QB's and most of these guys are pretty bad so far. A couple surprises in guys you would think would be higher on the list but still. Imagine if you ranked all the best RB's over the same period of time. The whole list would be full of studs lol.

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50 years technically, but yeah, most of the guys early on were pretty abysmal. Think how this would look if my sample size was smaller than ~5.5 seasons worth of starts.

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88. Lynn Dickey (Houston Oilers 1971-1975, Green Bay Packers 1976-1985)
3rd Place Packers QB
Career Record 47-61-3 (43.69%) 90th out of 102


Record in Games with Good Defense 32-15-3 (67.00%) 92nd out of 102
Record in Games with Bad Defense 15-46-0 (24.59%) 69th out of 102
Percentage of Games with Good Defense 50/111 (45.05%) 78th out of 102 (-10)


Wins Above Average Starter in a 16 Game Season (-0.533)


Image result for lynn dickey

 

There were some dark days in Green Bay, from Vince Lombardi's retirement to the advent of Mike Holmgren. For that near quarter century, the Packers struggled to find that legacy that brought them so many championships. Lynn Dickey represents the best of that dark era for the Packers, at a time where they couldn't find playmakers and had a real difficult time of drawing players to the frozen tundra. Dickey was a backup in Houston, never able to supplant Dan Pastorini for the job in the early 70's, and very turnover prone in relief, throwing 8 TD's and 28 INT's during his 5 year stint for the Oilers. He had a rough start as a Packer after being traded in 76, throwing just 12 TDs to 28 picks before breaking his leg in 77, missing the rest of that season, all of 78' and most of 79'. If his career had ended there it would have been a sad state of affairs, but after recovering from his injury he hit his stride in his 30's, putting up a lot of yards, a lot of points... and a lot of interceptions. Dude gave the ball away like a philanthropic leper gives away everything. He did however set the Packers record for yardage and points in a season in 1983 with 4458 yards, and 429 points, but those marks have since been broken by Aaron Rodgers. The Packers made the playoffs once in his tenure during the strike shortened season of 1982, but they were eliminated by the Cowboys in the second round thanks in large part for his propensity to throw picks. Dickey could sling it with the best of them, but he made so many crucial mistakes that he often gave up losses in games where his defense actually did decide to show up.

And as you can see he is only 1 of 3 Packer QB's on this list. Favre and Rodgers will be making appearances later, but Bart Starr did not qualify for starts in the super bowl era.

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87. Steve Beuerlein (Oakland Raiders 1987-1990, Dallas Cowboys 1991-1992, Arizona Cardinals 1993-1994, Jacksonville Jaguars 1995, Carolina Panthers 1996-2000, Denver Broncos 2001-2003)
7th Place Cardinals QB and 3rd Place Panthers QB
Career Record 49-57-0 (46.23%) 85th out of 102


Record in Games with Good Defense 38-17-0 (69.09%) 81st out of 102
Record in Games with Bad Defense 11-40 (21.47%) 88th out of 102
Percentage of Games with Good Defense 55/106 (51.89%) 52nd out of 102 (-35)


Wins Above Average Starter in a 16 Game Season (-0.530)

Image result for steve beuerlein

 

Beuerlein is probably better known as an announcer, but as it turns out he did have a fairly lengthy career in the NFL, even if it took a long time for him to finally get a starting job. As a 4th round pick for the Raiders he mostly played backup to their revolving door of QB's but he was solid in relief so the Cowboys took him on when his first contract was up. He was a warm enough body to win with that stacked Dallas team in 91, and won a super bowl as a backup in 92 before finally getting a chance to start for real in Arizona. The Cardinals were alright under him, but they couldn't retain him when the expansion draft came around, and he ended being a backup for both the Jags and Panthers in a span of 2 years. Once Kerry Collin's alcoholism hit his team, he finally had a chance to lead the Panthers. While he never got a team past .500 as a starter, he was always a commendable backup and a fair starter when he needed to be. If you're judging him as a starter, he never really broke into that echelon save for his 99' and 00' season, he was just a capable backup who played long enough and got enough chances to just barely break the 90 starts needed for this list. And hell, the fact that he did better on this list than a lot of high draft picks is a testament to his grit. 

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And we're onto the last player in the Journeyman Rank. The guys from here on qualify as average. Behold, mediocrity!

86. Joe Ferguson (Buffalo Bills 1973-1984, Detroit Lions 1985-1987, Tampa Bay Bucs 1988-1989, Indianapolis Colts 1990)
3rd Place Bills QB
Career Record 80-90-0 (47.06%) 80th out of 102


Record in Games with Good Defense 59-28-0 (67.82%) 86th out of 102
Record in Games with Bad Defense 21-62-0 (25.30%) 66th out of 102
Percentage of Games with Good Defense 87/170 (51.18%) 57th out of 102 (-29)


Wins Above Average Starter in a 16 Game Season (-0.507)

Image result for joe ferguson

 

Joe Ferguson, aka the guy who handed the ball off to OJ Simpson had a long... very long career for the Bills. During his first 3 seasons in the league, he barely had to throw the ball more than 20 times a games, letting Juice do all the work. His fortunes changed around 1977 when he needed to become the centrepiece of the offense and sling it down field a lot more. Of course, the Bills got much worse as a result, toiling in mediocrity for most of the early live ball era. The Bills drafted Jim Kelly in 1983, but he went to go play in the USFL, so Ferguson got to start for a couple more seasons, but after an abysmal 1-10 showing in 1984, the Bills finally decided to move on. He bounced around as a backup in Detroit, Tampa and Indianapolis before finally hanging up the cleats in 1990. Ferguson's raw numbers for the era weren't very impressive but he stayed healthy, kept his TD:INT ratio around 1, and his completion percentage a shade above 50% for most of his prime, and he managed to have a long career, especially for the era he played in. Nobody will talk about Ferguson as one of the all time greats, but he was just a solid game managerwho was occasionally prone to a real stinker of a game from time to time. He was fortunate to play with OJ Simpson for most of the dead ball era which probably contributed to his long career, the game is a lot easier when you only have to throw 20 times a game. The Bills made the playoffs three times in his career, losing in the Divisional Round each time.

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Bills fans have been through a lot, man and it looks like Allen is pretty easily the worst QB in the draft class but it's still early lol. Whatever happens I think they should keep McDermott around. He's done a decent job. I mean, they're at least respectable now.

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85. Aaron Brooks (Green Bay Packers 1999, New Orleans Saints 2000-2005, Oakland Raiders 2006)
5th Place Saints QB
Career Record 39-53-0 (42.39%) 91st out of 102


Record in Games with Good Defense 24-15-0 (61.54%) 99th(T) out of 102 
Record in Games with Bad Defense 15-38-0 (28.30%) 49th out of 102
Percentage of Games with Good Defense 39/92 (42.39%) 85th out of 102 (0)


Wins Above Average Starter in a 16 Game Season (-0.414)

Image result for Aaron brooks nfl

 

Aaron Brooks had a very weird trajectory for his career, and he's basically just Saints trivia at this point. His career was a very short 7 seasons, but he was the first QB to ever win a post season game for the Saints. While the Saints had made the postseason several times in the Dome Patrol era, they were bounced in the wild card each of the 4 times they showed up. Aaron Brooks led the Saints to the postseason in his rookie year, and outscored the Greatest Show on Turf in 2000 before folding to the Vikings in the divisional round. Brooks never tasted the playoffs again after that, but his play in his rookie season brought a lot of hope to Saints fans. However, the saints were plagued with poor defense for most of the 2000's, and Brooks could only keep the team around .500 before having a major collapse in 2005 that got him benched, got his coach Jim Haslett fired, and Sean Payton brought in. Drew Brees became a free agent, and Brooks' time in New Orleans was done in a rather ignominious fashion. He joined the Raiders the next season, but played musical chairs at the position with Andrew Walter and could never recover the magic he displayed early in his career. Brooks was released at the end of the season, and decided to hang them up at age 30.

Brooks was a remarkably inconsistent player, his record when his defenses showed up to play was among the worst of all players in this study, and yet he had a knack for the dramatic, always seeming to match the offenses he faced, and playing a lot of games tight until the 4th quarter. However, he took a serious decline at 29, and it may have had something to do with being unable to adjust to losing his speed as he got older, and his teams lost 18 of his last 21 starts as a result.

Edited by RazorStar
  • Upvote 2

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