Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Cherry

Cherry's 7 Round Mock Draft (Rounds come separate)

Recommended Posts

Welcome to Cherry's big ol 7 rounder mock draft! A few things to keep in mind as you ponder this mock


1. I'm making these selections purely as a combination of my talent grade, perceived value, and positional need.


2. I'm going to be picking based on current team depth charts, so I will be consistently making picks based on where holes are. I'll post depth charts at the end of the draft if they are requested so you can see how your team looks in my post-mock world. :)


3. I'm a maniac, and if you're mad because I gave your team a guy with a garbage grade, I'm sorry.


Here are the completed depth charts in my mock draft world.




Round 1


The Browns have traded the #1 overall pick to the Jets for #6, #39, 2018 1st rounder, and a 2018 2nd rounder.


1. :Jets: DeShone Kizer, QB, Notre Dame


The Jets need a quarterback, and Kizer is the best one on the board in my opinion. The demand is much higher there for the position than in Cleveland, and Cleveland should just continue to load up on picks.


2. :49ers: Mitchell Trubisky, QB, North Carolina


The demand for a quarterback in San Francisco is very similar to the demand in New York, but the 49ers should be content to take whichever man falls to them here. I like Trubisky as a solid starter for the next 8-10 years. He's a 12-15 kind of quarterback in today's NFL, and will likely earn a couple pro bowl nods.


3. :Bears: Budda Baker, S/CB , Washington


I believe Baker is the best safety in this class, and can play all over your defense. He has the ability to work in the slot when necessary, and can take most receivers one-on-one. He should be an immediate impact player for the Bears. His versatility gets him the nod over some cornerbacks here.


The Jags have traded the #4 overall pick to the Panthers for the #8, #40, #98, and a 2018 third rounder.


4. :panthers: Leonard Fournette, RB, LSU


Fournette is a game-changing running back, and when given space to work with he can smash almost anyone he goes up against. He's a bruiser than would bully the NFC South. It's a costly move for the Panthers, but one that would fit well.


5. :Titans: Marshon Lattimore, CB, Ohio State


Lattimore is arguably the best cornerback in this class, and he'd likely be the first guy I select given the limitations on Kazee and the injuries Jones has. He isn't as tight in coverage as you'd like, but he can play in any scheme and has some rare athleticism at the position. He's effortless in his movements, and has fluidity that you don't often see. Ability to track any receiver.


6. :Browns: Malik Hooker, S, Ohio State


Malik Hooker has the upside to be an Ed Reed caliber player. He has great range and ball skills, and would immediately start in such a poor DB group. The Browns should be ecstatic to replace Ed Reynolds as their starting free safety.


7. :Chargers: Jamal Adams, S, LSU


The Chargers snatch up one of the best safeties in this class by getting Jamal Adams. He can play both in-the-box or in coverage, and has the tackling to take out almost anyone once they get the ball. He's a great replacement for Weddle, and slots in over Addae.



8. :jags: O.J. Howard, TE, Alabama


Howard is one of the most surefire TE prospects in years, and arguably the best one since Vernon Davis. He has some serious Gronk power to his game, and will run through guys like they're not even there. The Jags need a weapon with Marcedes Lewis fading into oblivion.


9. :Bengals: Haason Reddick, ILB, Temple


Reddick can do it all. He has the speed to cover like a cornerback, the power in his tackling to bring down almost anyone, and the pass-rushing talent to be used as a blitzer. He's a rare blend of everything for the position, and while he isn't the athlete that Myles Jack was, he's in a very similar tier.



10. :Bills: John Ross, WR, Washington


Ross should be the first receiver off the board. He destroyed the combine, and is very polished for being such a great athlete. While he is likely not going to be the #1 target for a team, he is going to have ridiculous production with the right team. With Watkins to take pressure off of him, he should destroy it in Buffalo.


11. :Saints: Myles Garrett, DE, Texas A&M


Considered by many to be the best defensive end in this class, Garrett blew the roof off the combine. He has rare speed and power for his size, but he doesn't always demonstrate it consistently on tape. While I don't think he is worthy of a top 3 pick, he's a good pick here for the Saints. He slots in across from Cameron Jordan.


12. :Browns: Jonathan Allen, DE, Alabama


I'm using the Browns 3-4 defense right now, so I'm going to project most of their defensive front picks around that. It's a huge part in why I took I selected Hooker over Garrett, who doesn't fit naturally in a 3-4. That said, Allen is the best 3-4 DE in this class, demonstrating impressive energy and athleticism for his size. He's explosiveness, and can get pressure as a 3-tech.



13. :Cardinals: Dan Feeney, OG, Indiana


I considered Malik McDowell here, but I think the Cardinals would be better suited to upgrade over Cole Toner. That line could be pretty fearsome with Feeney, Iupati, and Veldheer. It's not a sexy pick, but it's the best pick. Feeney is a beast day one.


14. :Eagles: Sidney Jones, CB, Washington


Sidney Jones is the top cornerback on my board if you discount the injury, and I think the gap between him and other cornerbacks here are too large to pass up. The Eagles desperately need help at cornerback, and while they may need to wait a year for Jones, he is a smart selection here on a defense that has some pretty scary guys already.


15. :Colts: Malik McDowell, DE, Michigan State


Margus Hunt is not a starting caliber player right now. The Colts need to juice up the interior defensive line, and this pick does it. There are questions about McDowell's motor and character, but when he's on he is one of the most terrifying players on the field. He should have an immediate impact.


16. :Ravens: Corey Davis, WR, Western Michigan


The Ravens #2 receiver right now is Michael Campanaro. This is absolutely insane if you're trying to go into the season with this group, and Corey Davis would come in as the immediate #1 target for Flacco. He has the potential to be the next Antonio Brown type of player, and should immediately succeed in Baltimore.


17. :Redskins: Cam Robinson, OG, Alabama


Shawn Lauvao is not a serviceable starter for the Redskins, and Cam Robinson should take over immediately as their guard across from Scherff. He's a bully in the run game, and fits that team well.



18. :Titans: Chad Hansen, WR, California


While they would probably prefer to get Ross or Davis, Hansen is the prototypical #1 receiver. He has some of the cleanest footwork in this class, and can be a legitimate jump ball threat. He doesn't have anything special physically outside of his hands and ability to elevate for the ball, but he's very nuanced.


19. :Bucs: David Njoku, TE, Miami


I considered Elflein here, but I think Njoku is more important. The Tampa line isn't terrible, and the Bucs could go back for the center position. Njoku is an immediate impact player at tight end, and would become a great threat for Winston to work off of. Brate isn't good enough to warrant a starting spot, and Njoku could be a Vernon Davis-lite.



20. :Broncos: Forrest Lamp, OG, Western Kentucky

While I think Lamp is better as a tackle, he has the versatility to play all over the line. He's certainly a better pick here than some of the lesser guards such as Siragusa or Moton. He likely slots in as a guard here, but could end up playing outside if Stephenson doesn't do well at the LT spot.


21. :Lions: DeMarcus Walker, DE, Florida State


While Derek Barnett is definitely appealing, I think Walker is more dominant in the run game. He's a good fit across from Ansah, and both are incredibly physically imposing. The buzz for Taco Charlton here is outrageous,


22. :dolphins: Nico Siragusa, OG, San Diego State


I don't see the Dolphins rolling out Anthony Steen as their starting guard next year, so I'd be willing to bet they go for one in the draft. I think Siragusa is much more well-rounded than a lot of the other remaining guys like Dorian Johnson and Taylor Moton, but both are in play here. The Dolphins need to leave the first two rounds with a guard though.


23. :Giants: Reuben Foster, LB, Alabama


I can't see Goodson as the starting MLB next year, so I would not be shocked to see the Giants invest in their LB corps here. While they do need some help on their offensive line, I don't know if there are any options here that are valuable enough to go in this range.



24. :Raiders: Caleb Brantley, DT, Florida


They need a guy to pair beside Dan Williams, and Brantley fits the mold. He's an absolute terror when it comes to the pass-rushing aspect of his game. He should be a very good starter for years down the road. That Raiders D-line could get mean.


The Texans have traded the #25 pick to the Browns for the #33, and #65 pick.


25. :Browns: Josh Jones, S, North Carolina State


The Browns need a safety bad enough to move up for Jones here, and the Texans can afford to move back with the quarterbacks that are available on the board. The Browns cement that back end of their secondary with a bully and a ball-hawk with their first round selections.


26. :Seahawks: Roderick Johnson, OT, Florida State


While I was seriously considering going for Ahkello Witherspoon here, I don't think it's a smart move with Richard Sherman still on the team. Joeckel has the starting job right now, and he is across from Garry Gilliam. Neither is that great, so I think the move to buff up the line is the right one for the Seahawks.



27. :Chiefs: Wayne Gallman, RB, Clemson


I think the immediate impact of Gallman on this offense will propel them towards another playoff appearance, despite the rest of the division getting buffed up. He's not as fast as Jamaal Charles was, but he is a great accelerator. He's a one cut and fly kind of back, and can do it all.


The Cowboys have traded the #28, #92, and #211 picks to the Seahawks for the #106 pick, and CB Richard Sherman.


28. :Seahawks: Ahkello Witherspoon, CB, Colorado


Boom. Just like that, Richard Sherman is a Cowboy. The Cowboys are in win now mode, and would do their best to just simply accumulate as much talent as possible, and I think they'd be willing to ship out the first for Sherman. Ahkello is a great fit for the Seahawks defense, and fills the hole that Sherman leaves. He's a huge outside corner, and would likely dominate in that scheme.


29. :Packers: Jarron Jones, NT, Notre Dame


One of the most dominant interior linemen in this draft, Jones should provide an immediate impact for the Packers defense. He has the skills to dominate in both the run and passing game, and can generate pressure from the inside. It's not the sexiest pick, but the Packers get a very good nose tackle here.



30. :Steelers: Mike Williams, WR, Clemson


Surprise surprise. Sammie Coates hasn't quite developed the way you'd expect, and Martavis Bryant is still in purgatory. With Wheaton gone, and Heyward-Bey as the #2 receiver right now, the Steelers load up on their offense with a big target for Ben. Williams with Antonio Brown would be outrageous.


31. :Falcons: Derek Barnett, DE, Tennessee


Barnett is one of the best players available here, and immediately helps bring a pass-rushing edge to the Falcons defense. He's one of the best base 4-3 DEs in this class, and should tear it up on a defense that has guys like Beasley and Poe to draw attention.


32. :Saints: Adoree Jackson, CB, USC

I considered Kazee and Howard Wilson here, but the value wasn't enough to make him the pick. With Tabor's character concerns, I think Adoree Jackson is a quality pick here for the Saints as they look to buff up their defense and add depth at cornerback. The return ability helps.

Edited by Chernobyl420
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Round 2

 

1 (33). :Texans: Ejuan Price, OLB, Pittsburgh

 

With a lot of the pressure taken off of him due to the pressure that Clowney and Watt can generate inside, I think Price is the best fit here for the Texans. He's a ball of energy, and is one of the most twitched up guys in this class. He's undersized, but his technique and range of moves are superb.

 

 

2 (34). :49ers: Avery Gennesy, OT, Texas A&M

 

He has the mobility and the hand technique to be an immediate starter, and the 49ers need an upgrade at right tackle. I believe he is talented enough to take over the left side from Staley, but he is certainly worth an early pick. If you want a guy to help protect your new franchise quarterback in the passing game, he's your guy.

 

3 (35). :jags: Damontae Kazee, CB, San Diego State

Kazee is an instant starter in the slot, and has the potential to start outside. After drafting Ramsey and signing A.J. Bouye to a huge deal, it's likely Kazee is just the third cornerback for the Jags. However, the group lacks depth and Kazee is a great addition.

 

4 (36). :Bears: Evan Engram, TE, Ole Miss

 

The Bears need a tight end, with Zach Miller being their only real threat at the position. I think the potential to use Engram as a big threat for Glennon is great, and he would add another dimension to their offense. He replaces Alshon as the big-bodied target. He's not the greatest blocker, but he can throw his weight out there when he needs to.

 

5 (37). :Rams: Pat Elflein, C, Ohio State

 

The need to bolster the interior offensive line is certainly there for the Rams. While they have added some help for Goff, they need to continue to build a good group ahead of him. Elflein is the best center in this class, and should be the first one off the board.

 

6 (38). :Chargers: Taylor Moton, OG, Western Michigan

 

While I'm a big believer in Damien Mama, I think he will be much less likely to succeed in the passing game. Moton can do it all much better than Mama, and should be an immediate starter for the Chargers at guard.

 

7 (39). :Browns: Howard Wilson, CB, Houston

 

There are concerns about Wilson in terms of character, but he's a dominant CB1 when he's on the field. He has the physical tools to take on anyone, and does a great job of using his hands to get the ball out of the way. His game is just incredibly well-rounded, and he should be a day one starter.

 

8 (40). :jags: Damien Mama, OG, USC

 

He's a massive man, and will absolutely starch his opponents in the run game. While he doesn't have the greatest 40-yard dash, he has the quickness to pull across the formation to hit people. When he gets his hands on guys, he eats them for lunch.

 

9 (41). :Bengals: Jabrill Peppers, S, Michigan

 

Peppers may not be the most polished safety, but he's a very good athlete and has top end acceleration. He could play both in coverage or in run defense, and will likely be a day one starter for the Bengals.

 

10 (42). :Saints: Curtis Samuel, RB, Ohio State

 

Samuel is one of the most electric playmakers in this class, and can do damage both as a runner and a receiver. He fits in great with the New Orleans offense, and he will be a great complement to Mark Ingram.

 

11 (43). :Eagles: Joe Mixon, RB, Oklahoma

 

The off-the-field concerns are going to scare off a lot of people, but Mixon is a very good fit for Philadelphia. Behind the offensive line he should be able to find a lot of room to work from. I considered Kareem Hunt here, but the need for a guy with a good mixture of skills made Mixon the top pick here.

 

12 (44). :Bills: John Johnson, S, Boston College

 

Johnson is a hard-hitting run defender who dominates any time he gets into contact. He's a great pick to solidify the back end of the secondary, and the Bills would do well to jump on him or Delano Hill here.

 

13 (45). :Cardinals: Tanner Vallejo, LB, Boise State

 

While he isn't always the most consistent tackler, Vallejo has sideline-to-sideline coverage skills, and would be a great replacement for Karlos Dansby, who has struggled lately with his ability to move in the passing game. Vallejo is a solid starter from day one.

 

14 (46). :Colts: Tim Williams, OLB, Alabama

 

While the off-the-field issues will likely drop Williams from being a first rounder, he is certainly one of the more talented pass-rushers in this class. The Colts would be wise to jump on him here if they believe he can stay clean.

 

15 (47). :Ravens: Ryan Anderson, OLB, Alabama

 

Anderson isn't as polished in terms of what he can do as a pass rusher in comparison to his teammate, but he is a great athlete and can drop out into coverage. He's a great pairing across from Terrell Suggs.

 

16 (48). :Vikings: K.D. Cannon, WR, Baylor

One of the freakiest athletes in this class at the wide receiver position, Cannon is capable of stretching the field and making big plays after the catch. He has #1 receiver size and speed, and typically shows good hands. However, he needs to refine his route-running. He's very similar to Michael Thomas from last year.

 

7 (49). :Redskins: Dalvin Tomlinson, DE, Alabama

 

Tomlinson is one of the better run defenders in this class, and a very solid overall prospect. He's not going to dominate in the passing game, but will fit in well with the Redskins scheme.

 

18 (50). :Bucs: Ryan Switzer, WR, North Carolina

 

The quest to load Jameis up with more weapons is on, and after adding Njoku, Winston is still in need of more weapons at receiver. He has Evans and an aged DeSean Jackson, but it wouldn't hurt to add a very solid slot receiver. Switzer has the talent to get 80 catches as a rookie, and will only be harmed by his lackluster size and athleticism. He's a clean route-runner, and has great hands.

 

19 (51). :Broncos: Tyler Orlosky, C, West Virginia

 

Once again bolstering the offensive line, the Broncos go with a very good center that could develop into a pro bowler within a few years. Orlosky is a bully in the run game, but doesn't typically need help in the pass game to succeed.

 

20 (52). :Browns: Carl Lawson, OLB, Auburn

 

Lawson should immediately step in to create pressure off the edge for the Browns, and is one of the better 3-4 edge rushers in this class. He's bendy, and has good natural strength.

 

21 (53). :Lions: Jalen Tabor, CB, Florida

I don't buy the idea that D.J. Hayden is a serviceable starter across from Darius Slay. Tabor has the ability to mirror guys perfectly with footwork, and will be lockdown in coverage on most routes. His off-the-field concerns and mediocre 40-yard dash have people dropping him significantly, but he's still one of the better cornerbacks in this class.

 

22 (54). :dolphins: Tarell Basham, DE, Ohio

With Mario Williams disappointing, and William Hayes now being the man across from Cameron Wake, there is a need to go defensive end here. Basham can do it all, and is a prototype 5-tech. He's a great fit for Miami, and would be a good pairing with Wake.

 

23 (55). :Giants: Chase Roullier, OG, Colorado

 

A solid starter at guard, Roullier can work both as a guard or center. He adds depth to the Giants offensive line, and will be an immediate upgrade over John Jerry.

 

24 (56). :Raiders: Taywan Taylor, WR, Western Kentucky

While Cooper and Crabtree are a very solid duo, there is a need for more weapons on the Raiders offense. Taylor is a great fit for the slot, and while he isn't the biggest guy he has great hands and route-running. He's an immediate impact player for Oakland, and would immediately overtake Patterson and Seth Roberts. Feed Carr options.

 

25 (57). :Texans: Jerod Evans, QB, Virginia Tech

I considered Evans in the first round, but didn't want to pull the trigger on a guy rated so low. Kaaya is another option here, but Evans has one of the best arms in this class and moves well. Worth the shot here. Kelly would be the pick without the injuries and character concerns.

 

26 (58). :Seahawks: Dorian Johnson, OG, Pittsburgh

 

He's a starting caliber guard, and the Seahawks need to continue to bolster their offensive line. He fills the second huge hole on that line, and the Seahawks would be silly to skip over him.

 

27 (59). :Chiefs: Solomon Thomas, DE, Stanford

 

While I'm not the biggest fan of Thomas, in the right system with the right guys around him he can thrive. He is ridiculously explosive off the stunt, and will fly into the backfield when schemed to do so. He needs help to get in a favorable position, but I think the Chiefs open up enough opportunities for him that he will find a way to produce. Beside Hali or Houston? He's a killer.

 

28 (60). :Cowboys: Gerald Everett, TE, South Alabama

 

Everett is likely to spend more time out in the slot rather than as an in-line blocker, but he's a huge threat to give to Dak. With Witten declining, the Cowboys need to consider finding another safety net for their quarterback. Don't be shocked if they consider George Kittle here, as he blew up the combine and has the blocking traits to fill Witten's role down the road.

 

29 (61). :Packers: Dustin Stanton, OG, Oregon State

 

One of the best remaining guards, the Packers need to grab an immediate starter at the position. Takk McKinley is very appealing here, but Nick Perry was just given an extension.

 

30 (62). :Steelers: Gareon Conley, CB, Ohio State

 

Takk McKinley is once again very appealing here, but the need for a cornerback across from Artie Burns is real. Cockrell isn't good enough to warrant passing on Conley. An immediate starter for the Steelers.

 

31 (63). :Falcons: Trey Hendrickson, DE, Florida Atlantic

 

While Hendrickson is a more natural fit as an outside linebacker, he can play a very similar role to what Brooks Reed is already playing. He's incredibly explosive off the edge, and has a solid base of moves to work from.

 

 

32 (64). :panthers: Kevin King, CB, Washington

The Panthers get a very good corner here who should become an immediate starter. King has serious physical upside, and plays with great length. He's not as polished as some of the top guys in this class, but he's every bit worth this selection. He slots in immediately across from Bradberry.

Edited by Chernobyl426

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Round 3

 

1 (65). :Texans: Delano Hill, S, Michigan

 

With K.J. Dillon listed as their starting safety, and Andre Hal beside him, the Texans would do for an upgrade at the position. Hill is a bully on the back end of the defense, and he's the type to bring the heat in the run game.

 

2 (66). :49ers: T.J. Watt, OLB, Wisconsin

 

When given the opportunity to open up in the passing game, he has a knack for getting after the quarterback. He can defend the run, and tested like a freak at the combine. He's one of the better pass-rushing linebackers in this class, and slots in well for the 49ers.

 

3 (67). :Bears: Brad Kaaya, QB, Miami

 

When given time to work, Kaaya is one of the better quarterbacks in this class. He has a good arm and solid frame in general. He has serious problems when he gets pressured, and will get wild with his accuracy. However, he could be an early starter at the next level in the right situation.

 

4 (68). :jags: Samson Ebukam, OLB, Eastern Washington

 

Ebukam is a perfect replacement for Jack when Jack shifts inside over Posluszny. It's time to crown the heir apparent for the outside linebacker position, and with Skuta gone it's a huge need. Ebukam is a great blend of pass-rushing talent and coverage skills. He's a hell of an athlete, and while raw, he has huge upside.

 

5 (69). :Rams: Jehu Chesson, WR, Michigan

 

Chesson brings #1 receiver upside, although he likely won't ever be that dominant of a force. He is a good possession receiver who has the height to win jump balls. His hands are solid, and he can do a lot for your quarterback.

 

6 (70). :Jets: Adam Bisnowaty, OT, Pittsburgh

 

Bisnowaty has the length and power to stick you at the end of his range and keep you at distance in the passing game. He's not as good of a mover as some of the other tackles in the class, but he can keep guys pinned at a distance.

 

7 (71). :Chargers: Tre'Davious White, CB, LSU

 

Tre'Davious White allows Heyward to move back into the slot where he is a more natural fit. He has the upside to be a #1 cornerback, and could develop into a very solid starter in Los Angeles. He's a good jack-of-all-trades kind of cornerback. He's versatile enough to play in any way the Chargers see fit.

 

8 (72). :Pats: James Onwualu, OLB, Notre Dame

 

While Jarrad Davis is appealing here, the Patriots can't pass up on the coverage ability of Onwualu. He's rangy and has a good overall game that would be appealing to the Patriots defense.

 

9 (73). :Bengals: Chad Wheeler, OT, USC

 

Wheeler is a great fit as a pass blocker, and could fight for reps in Cincinnati immediately. While the Bengals will likely want to see what they have in Cedric Ogbuehi and Jake Fisher, Wheeler is a solid backup plan.

 

10 (74). :Ravens: Kareem Hunt, RB, Toledo

Hunt is one of the toughest backs in this class to bring down, and will likely become the star of the Baltimore backfield if he goes there. He rarely loses the football, and while he doesn't have the speed to hit a home run, he will consistently pick up yards after contact. His balance through hits is abnormal.

 

11 (75). :Bills: Chad Kelly, QB, Ole Miss

 

Want to fix a troubled kid who has huge upside? Be the city his uncle became a legend in. If there's any way to fix the problems Kelly has, it's by growing him in this organization. He's a potential pro bowler in terms of actual talent, and should sit behind Tyrod for a year or two. He makes mistakes with the football, but everything else is there.

 

12 (76). :Saints: Jarrad Davis, OLB, Florida

 

He's a physical powerhouse, and dominates in the run game. He isn't the fastest in coverage, but plays away enough to hold up. He should be an immediate upgrade over Dannell Ellerbe.

 

13 (77). :Cardinals: Deshaun Watson, QB, Clemson

 

Watson has all the credentials you'd expect for a top end prospect coming out of college, but he has serious problems when it comes to properly reading defenses, and will likely require time to develop his game and adjust to the NFL. Bruce Arians is the perfect coach to teach him, and making him the heir to Carson Palmer would work out well.

 

14 (78). :Ravens: Ryan Higgins, QB, Louisiana Tech

 

Newsome must know that Mallett is not a sufficient backup if Flacco goes down, and Higgins is talented enough to take as a potential heir down the line. Flacco may only have a few years left, and if the Ravens can grow something underneath him it could make it easier to move on when the times comes.

15 (79). :Vikings: Andreas Knappe, OT, Connecticut

 

Mike Remmers is not nearly sufficient enough on the left side, and the addition of Knappe would help to strengthen that side of the line. He may not start immediately, but if Remmers struggles there is a very good chance he sees the field as a rookie.

 

 

16 (80). :Colts: Joshua Holsey, CB, Auburn

 

Holsey isn't always perfect in his coverage, but he plays feisty and will always fight to win the matchup. He can take on bigger guys with that tenacity, and has very good ball skills. He's worth the pick here to buff up the back end in Indy.

 

17 (81). :Redskins: Shock Linwood, RB, Baylor

 

He doesn't get nearly enough love, and didn't get an invite to the combine, but he was very deserving. He has great balance, and can create openings in the run game. He is tough to get a hold of due to a constantly changing frame. Immediate starter in Washington.

 

18 (82). :Broncos: George Kittle, TE, Iowa

 

One of the most well-rounded tight ends in this class, Kittle blew up the combine in a shocking performance. He's not a great receiver, but can catch passes when asked to. He really makes his money in the running game, and will blow through guys as a blocker.

 

19 (83). :Titans: Kyle Kalis, OG, Michigan

 

One of the better guards in this class, Kalis is a jack-of-all trades lineman who can do it all. He's not as mobile as you'd like if you intend to use him in the power run, but he can chip guys very well. He's great in the passing game, and immediately slots in over Quinton Spain.

 

20 (84). :Bucs: Parker Collins, C, Appalachian State

 

He's a mauler in the run game, and loves to finish his blocks. He is a bit on the heavy side, but can hold is own on the move. He's the do-it-all center that a team can start from day one.

 

21 (85). :Lions: Ryan Glasgow, DT, Michigan

 

He's a great pass-rusher, and can generate pressure up the middle easily. He's not as big as you'd like, but he plays with some fire to his game. There is a very good chance he starts over Haloti Ngata on the first day of real football.

 

22 (86). :Vikings: J.J. Dielman, C, Utah

 

One of the more mobile centers in this class, Dielman has the athleticism to move well in space, and will be a great asset if you want to have him pulling around the formation. He has the versatility to play all over the line.

 

The Giants have traded the #87 pick to the Bears for the #111, and #117 pick.

 

23 (87). :Bears: Dede Westbrook, WR, Oklahoma

 

Outside the off-the-field concerns, Westbrook is one of the best receivers in this class. He's great with the ball in his hands, and has the route-running skills to be one of the best guys to be picked this year.

 

24 (88). :Raiders: Jeremy McNichols, RB, Boise State

 

One of the best backs in this class when it comes to lateral quickness, McNichols can be a workhorse at the next level. He dominates when given time to decipher what's in front of him and making a cut off of it. He's not as balanced as Gallman, and plays more east-to-west, but he's a capable starter for Oakland.

 

25 (89). :Texans: Casey Tucker, OT, Stanford

 

He is very solid in pass protection, and should be an immediate starter for the Texans over Derek Newton. He's great with his hand placement, and can get defensive ends on their heels with ease.

 

 

26 (90). :Seahawks: Rayshawn Jenkins, S, Miami

 

He has one of the more well-rounded games of any safety in this class, and has the range to play as a legitimate cover safety. While this class is stacked with hard hitters who make their money in the box, Jenkins can do it all. He's a good replacement for Earl Thomas in the long run.

 

27 (91). :Chiefs: Kenneth Olugbode, LB, Colorado

 

Olugbode is one of the better cover linebackers in this class, and can go from sideline-to-sideline. He slots in well as an immediate starter beside Derrick Johnson, and suits the Chiefs defense great.

 

28 (92). :Seahawks: Jarrod Clements, DT, Illinois

 

He's one of the more explosive defensive tackles in this class, and does a great job of generating pressure up the middle of the pocket. He's very similar to Glasgow in that he's an undersized DT with a lot of energy built up. He should take over as a starter quickly.

 

29 (93). :Packers: Takkarist McKinley, OLB, UCLA

 

He's likely going to sit behind Nick Perry from the jump, but he's a great upside prospect. He doesn't have refined technique, and instead relies on a constant motor that never shuts off to win his matchups. He's a situational pass-rusher to start his career in Green Bay, but could develop into a starter long term.

 

30 (94). :Steelers: Donnel Pumphrey, RB, San Diego State

 

Pumphrey will never earn the starting job, and that's not his fit. He needs 10-15 touches per game to be a legitimate home run hitter. There are concerns about his ability to take damage, but his running style protects him from taking head on shots. Solid #2 back who can shred a defense in a flat sprint.

 

31 (95). :Falcons: ArDarius Stewart, WR, Alabama

 

Stewart is one of the most well-rounded receivers in this class, and could take starting reps over Mohammad Sanu as a rookie. He's great with the ball in his hands, and has the physicality to beat up on defenders. In any other class he'd have an argument as an early second rounder.

 

32 (96). :Pats: Josh Posley, DE, Ball State

 

One of the more explosive and well-rounded 5-techs in this class, Posley is dominant off the edge. He isn't always consistent in the rushing game, but his ability as a pass-rusher could earn him the starting job over Ealy, and at worst he should get reps on passing downs.

 

33 (97). :dolphins: Shaquill Griffin, CB, UCF

 

He's one of the better athletes for the position in this class, and he has the upside to be a legitimate #1 cornerback for the Dolphins. He needs to work on his skills mirroring guys, but all the potential is there.

 

34 (98). :jags: Joey Ivie, DT, Florida

 

He does a great job of dominating at the line of scrimmage, and will bully guys off the snap. He's well-rounded, and can become an immediate starter over Sheldon Day.

 

35 (99). :Eagles: Pita Taumoepenu, DE, Utah

 

He's likely going to be a situational pass-rusher at the NFL level, but when he gets the opportunity to get after the quarterback he rarely fails. He's incredibly bendy, and has a solid arsenal of moves. While he's not as high upside as some of the other options here, he immediately improves the Eagles pass rush.

 

 

36 (100). :Titans: Casey Dunn, C, Jacksonville State

 

He's one of the more athletic centers in the class, and does a good job of finding his way through open space. He may not start immediately over Ben Jones, but should be pushing for the starting job every step of his rookie season.

 

37 (101). :Broncos: Trent Taylor, WR, Louisiana Tech

 

One of the most refined slot guys in this class, Taylor is incredibly undersized for the position. However, he finds room to work with great footwork, and his hands have glue on them. He's a value pick here that will be a solid safety net for the Broncos quarterback, whether it be Siemien or Lynch.

 

38 (102). :Seahawks: Xavier Woods, S, Louisiana Tech

 

Woods is a great run-stuffing safety who can diversify his game to do it all. He's a great future replacement to Kam Chancellor, and will pair up across from Rayshawn Jenkins on Seattle's backup defense.

 

39 (103). :Saints: Obi Melifonwu, S, Connecticut

 

Melifonwu may not be the most polished, but his physical upside is undeniable. He destroyed the combine, and has showcased examples of his potential on tape. He's an incomplete package right now, but the potential for growth is there. He's a solid pick here as a potential replacement for Vaccaro.

 

40 (104). :Chiefs: Darius English, OLB, South Carolina

 

English is a jittery edge rusher who can get experience behind Hali and Houston, and potentially grow into a starter down the line. He's likely going to just be a situational pass-rusher for the first few years of his career, though.

 

 

41 (105). :Steelers: Jeremy Sprinkle, TE, Arkansas

 

Sprinkle is one of the best blockers in this class, and blows through whoever he matches up with. He's athletic enough to make plays in the passing game, and can elevate more than you'd expect for his frame. He should be an immediate starter and safety net for Roethlisberger.

 

 

42 (106). :Cowboys: Isaac Asiata, OG, Utah

 

One of the better run blocking guards in the class, Asiata is likely the weakest of the guys on the Dallas line. However, with the loss of Doug Free to retirement and Ronald Leary to free agency, the Cowboys needed to upgrade at guard to move La'El Collins to tackle.

 

 

43 (107). :Jets: Stacy Coley, WR, Miami

 

The need for another weapon across from Eric Decker is dire with the loss of Brandon Marshall. Charone Peake is their current #2 and that won't cut it. Coley is a bit raw, but he has the athletic upside to be a solid #2. He's very similar to Corey Coleman, although he isn't quite the athlete that Coleman is. He has good hands and good physical talent, but he lacks the route-running you'd want for a top receiver.

Edited by Chernobyl426

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

...wut?

 

Quinton Spain is in no jeopardy of losing his job, he's a rock solid LG and has gotten better over the course of each of the last two seasons, and Ben Jones is a top 7 or 8 center in the league. We're not taking a guard and center that early.

 

We may look to replace Kline, but we brought in Lelito in the off-season and still have Tretola from the previous draft. If we draft a lineman it'd be late.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't know enough about the prospects, but the Eagles going CB/RB/DE makes a lot of sense. In this mock they should be going OL/WR/S in the next few rounds.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

...wut?

 

Quinton Spain is in no jeopardy of losing his job, he's a rock solid LG and has gotten better over the course of each of the last two seasons, and Ben Jones is a top 7 or 8 center in the league. We're not taking a guard and center that early.

 

We may look to replace Kline, but we brought in Lelito in the off-season and still have Tretola from the previous draft. If we draft a lineman it'd be late.

 

Alright, I'm shifting Spain back to the starting job, and putting Kline as the backup. It's too late to adjust, but from what I knew Spain was not a good guard. My apologies.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Round 4

 

1 (108). :Browns: Travin Dural, WR, LSU

 

Due to the lack of depth in the Cleveland receiving group, the Browns would be smart to pick up Dural as good depth. Their current #3 is Ricardo Louis, and that just won't cut it.

 

 

2 (109). :49ers: Jonathan Ford, S, Auburn

 

Don Jones is not nearly as good as you'd hope for a starting safety, and while Tartt may take the starting role next year, Ford will compete for it. He has starting caliber traits and should take the starting job if Jones and Tartt aren't on their best foot.

 

 

3 (110). :jags: Alex Kozan, OG, Auburn

 

While already adding Damien Mama, the Jags would be smart to continue to add line depth. There are some other options available that might be of more need, but Kozan has starter upside and holds up well in pass protection.

 

4 (111). :Giants: Carlos Watkins, DT, Clemson

 

While Adam Butler is an appealing pick here, Watkins is a better fit across from Damon Harrison. He's a solid pass-rusher and always finds his way into the backfield. He's not a game-breaker, but his overall game is well-rounded and worth starting 16 games.

 

 

5 (112). :Rams: Randall Goforth, S, UCLA

 

He's a good combo safety who can do it all on the back end. He should immediately take the starting job at strong safety, and if given the opportunity could be the best safety the Rams have.

 

6 (113). :Chargers: Charles Harris, OLB, Missouri

 

While he isn't always consistent with his pass-rush, Harris does a good job of bursting off the edge to get into the backfield. He's a solid starter, and an immediate upgrade over Kyle Emanuel.

 

 

7 (114). :Redskins: Dorian Williams, S, Princeton

 

Swearinger isn't terrible, but his range and tackling can be questionable at times. I think Williams takes the starting job by the end of camp, but he could just end up as a backup.

 

8 (115). :panthers: Dawuane Smoot, DE, Illinois

 

The Panthers can't pass this up. While they already have depth at the position, Smoot would be a good backup until Peppers retires, then he can slot in across from Johnson.

 

9 (116). :Bengals: Adam Butler, DT, Vanderbilt

 

Butler is a great rotational player to put behind Geno, and if given time he could develop into a solid starter in his own right. He has all the tools to take snaps from day one, but the Bengals situation will result in him riding the bench.

 

10 (117). :Giants: Jamaal Williams, RB, BYU

 

While Williams isn't as physical a power back as Conner, he has way better long speed, and showcases great vision. He's the stereotype workhorse back who makes his money through tough running and good decision-making, rather than flashy moves.

 

12 (118). :Eagles: Corn Elder, CB, Miami

 

Elder will likely do his best work as a zone corner who can break on the ball. He could get starting snaps his rookie season with Jones out of commission, but he's likely long term a depth corner, or a replacement for Patrick Robinson.

 

13 (119). :Cardinals: Marlon Humphrey, CB, Alabama

 

Humphrey likely slots in as an immediate starter across from Patrick Peterson. He has a tendency to get burnt deep, but he's a mean tackler and brings a physical presence that is rare at cornerback. The Cardinals would jump on that opportunity, especially with the support he has on the back end.

 

14 (120). :Vikings: Marcus Williams, S, Utah

 

While Sendejo isn't a bad safety, I think that Williams will end up being the starter if he goes to Minnesota. He's one of the final guys that can come in and start immediately largely on his talent level alone, rather than positional need. Solid starter for a while.

 

15 (121). :Colts: Erik Magnuson, OT, Michigan

 

Magnuson has the size to dominate the NFL level competition, and he has great range. He does a good job of pushing through his opposition, and can stick guys at the end of his reach in pass protection. Upgrade over Joe Haeg.

 

16 (122). :Ravens: Ethan Pocic, C, LSU

 

While Pocic is pretty well-regarded, he might not immediately take the starting job from Urschel. He's sluggish with his movement in the run game, but he can do a good job in the passing game when it comes to anchoring the line.

 

17 (123). :Redskins: Marquez White, CB, Florida State

 

White probably won't take the starting job from Breeland, but could end up as a great backup. He's likely only going to be successful playing outside, but when he gets reps he could be a very solid starter.

 

18 (124). :Titans: Dwayne Thomas, CB, LSU

 

Thomas didn't get nearly as much love as his fellow LSU defensive backs, but he could become a starter at the next level. With the addition of Lattimore, he's likely not going to be CB2, but stashing him for depth is a smart move by Tennessee.

 

19 (125). :Bucs: Jalen Reeves-Maybin, OLB, Tennessee

 

Reeves-Maybin is one of the better outside linebackers in this class, and would fit in perfectly next to Kwon and Lavonte David. He's not great in coverage, but he does a good job of bringing the heat in the run game.

 

20 (126). :Broncos: Desmond King, CB, Iowa

 

King is very similar to Roby coming out of college, and would be a great addition to the Denver cornerback group. He's insurance in case of injury, and would put pressure on Talib and Roby when contracts come up.

 

21 (127). :Lions: Jordan Evans, OLB, Oklahoma

 

Evans is a solid addition to the Lions LB group, and should be an immediate starter. Armbrister is not worth starting at all, and Evans would arguably be the best linebacker in that group.

 

22 (128). :Vikings: Noah Brown, WR, Ohio State

 

Brown may not become an immediate starter, but he could see more time than Thielen. He's a decent option, and would be help give more weapons to Bradford.

 

23 (129). :Raiders: Ben Gedeon, LB, Michigan

 

One of the better run-stuffers in this class, Gedeon is a beast when he comes down hill in the run game. He's not great in coverage, but can hold his own in zone. He's going to be a solid starter for the Raiders, and should immediately become the starter over Ben Heeney.

 

24 (130). :Texans: Dion Dawkins, OT, Temple

 

Dawkins has the versatility to play all over the offensive line, but would serve as a great heir to Duane Brown. If one of the linemen starts slacking off, he could see early playing time.

 

25 (131). :Pats: James Conner, RB, Pittsburgh

 

He's the replacement for Blount, and he is an even more powerful runner. He isn't the fastest, but he fits what the Patriots want to do very well. Just an old school power back.

 

26 (132). :Chiefs: Dalvin Cook, RB, Florida State

 

While they already added Gallman, the Chiefs probably won't be able to resist Cook here. He has great upside as a committee back, and would do well splitting carries with Gallman.

 

27 (133). :Cowboys: Lewis Neal, DE, LSU

 

Neal adds some depth to the Cowboys pass-rushing group, and would help ease the loss of many of their players due to suspension or injury. He's not a great player, but he's good enough to be a backup.

 

28 (134). :Packers: Cameron Sutton, CB, Tennessee

 

Sutton adds depth to a Green Bay group of corners that has been pretty banged up and inconsistent as of late. He can easily step in as the #3 cornerback of the group, and could take over as a starter if there are injuries.

 

29 (135). :Steelers: Al-Quadin Muhammad, OLB, Miami

 

Muhammad isn't going to be an immediate starter, but he has decent bend and can serve as a backup. Long term he may be able to come in as a low-end starter once Harrison leaves.

 

30 (136). :Falcons: Samaje Perine, RB, Oklahoma

 

Perine is a great future investment for the Falcons, who will likely have to let Coleman or Freeman walk in the near future. He's probably not going to be a down-to-down starter, but has the potential to be. He'll spend some time on the back of the rotation before assuming backup duties.

 

31 (137). :Colts: Cameron Hunt, OG, Oregon

 

Hunt has the talent to step in and start immediately, and would be serviceable for the Colts. He's not a great player, but he isn't terrible either, and would be worth the pick, especially with how mediocre Good is.

 

32 (138). :Bengals: Deyshawn Bond, C, Cincinnati

 

The Bengals need a replacement for Russell Bodine, and Bond could end up taking starting reps by the end of the season. He has heavy feet, but can drive through guys once he makes contact.

 

33 (139). :Eagles: Garett Bolles, OT, Utah

 

Bolles isn't as polished as people like to think, but he does have athletic upside and mobility to become a starter down the road. There's no chance he falls here in the real draft, but if he were to do so, the Eagles would get a hell of a steal to build up behind Jason Peters.

 

34 (140). :Giants: Jake Butt, TE, Michigan

 

Butt may not fall this far even with injury, but he is not nearly good enough a blocker to be selected earlier than this. The Giants get a legitimate starting TE if he ends up coming back from the ACL tear successfully, though. He'd be an immediate upgrade over Will Tye.

 

35 (141). :Rams: Zach Cunningham, LB, Vanderbilt

 

Cunningham can't tackle to save his life, but he is one of the faster linebackers in this class and would be a solid backup behind Barron. He has starter upside if he can learn to tackle.

 

36 (142). :Texans: Jalen Myrick, CB, Minnesota

 

Myrick is one of the best corners in this class in terms of physical upside, but is pretty raw in terms of coverage skills. He would be a good stash to the CB corps, and could be groomed to eventually start.

 

37 (143). :49ers: Tim Patrick, WR, Utah

 

He has the upside to be a legitimate #1 receiver, but there are a lot of raw aspects in his game. His height is tremendous, and he typically has good hands, but his route-running can be iffy.

 

38 (144). :Colts: Chidobe Awuzie, CB, Colorado

 

Awuzie isn't nearly as polished as he is hyped up to be, and has serious lapses in coverage at this point. However, he could immediately come in as an impact player for the Colts. He likely starts over Holsey outside.

Edited by Chernobyl426

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You cannot waste the 14th overall pick on such a boom/bust prospect that won't or at the very least shouldn't even play this year. I realize that a rookie CB isn't going to give the Eagles the kind of level of play that they'll need out of them this year, so why not go with Gratz or Robinson or Mills or sign another free agent anyway and Jones can start in 2018. I know it shouldn't factor into the equation but the amount of boo's this pick will get in Philly would be unprecedented. lol Anyway, you can't gamble with a guy who suffered an achilles injury with that high of a pick. Not with the healthy talent sitting there.

Edited by seanbrock

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like that you have Kittle in round 3. Just noticed it now... But I took him at the top of 4 in our mock game and I thought I would get blasted for reaching.. And honestly I probably wouldn't have argued much. I watched him play a lot and am probably a bit biased in his direction.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You cannot waste the 14th overall pick on such a boom/bust prospect that won't or at the very least shouldn't even play this year. I realize that a rookie CB isn't going to give the Eagles the kind of level of play that they'll need out of them this year, so why not go with Gratz or Robinson or Mills or sign another free agent anyway and Jones can start in 2018. I know it shouldn't factor into the equation but the amount of boo's this pick will get in Philly would be unprecedented. lol Anyway, you can't gamble with a guy who suffered an achilles injury with that high of a pick. Not with the healthy talent sitting there.

 

That's the thing. Based on the needs Philly has, and what the talent level was, I thought the upside of Sidney is worth the pick. Howard Wilson and Ahkello Witherspoon are in play there, but the value doesn't match up for where they will actually be picked. Ahkello had more consideration than Howard, but still. With Marshon off the board and the Eagles biggest need at CB, I had to roll the dice on Sidney. If it makes you feel better, there are few places the Eagles have huge holes based on what I saw. That team has some serious talent. :p

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like that you have Kittle in round 3. Just noticed it now... But I took him at the top of 4 in our mock game and I thought I would get blasted for reaching.. And honestly I probably wouldn't have argued much. I watched him play a lot and am probably a bit biased in his direction.

 

Not at all a reach, and if I needed a tight end badly I'd consider Kittle in the second round. I have him as my #6 tight end, but he could easily make a case for #3 if you need a blocker and not an Engram/Everett type. He's probably the most well-rounded guy outside of Howard. He's one of the best blocking tight ends in this class, and his combine shocked almost everyone. He doesn't play to that kind of athleticism, but has pass-catcher ability. He's a low-risk selection that should start immediately.

 

Honestly, I think he gets drafted early round three in the real draft as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would be furious...like beyond furious...so much so I might even start to hate Ozzie. Given how this "board" fell if this was our draft I would join Sean and DMAC and just riot from here to hell and back. If Takk McKinley is there and we take Ryan Anderson I would be irate especially if Conley, King, and Thomas are also there.

 

In the third if we took Hunt or Higgins it would be quite possibly the worst draft moves we have made in a while. I understand the Ravens are division rivals breh, but damn you fucked us in this one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would be furious...like beyond furious...so much so I might even start to hate Ozzie. Given how this "board" fell if this was our draft I would join Sean and DMAC and just riot from here to hell and back. If Takk McKinley is there and we take Ryan Anderson I would be irate especially if Conley, King, and Thomas are also there.

 

In the third if we took Hunt or Higgins it would be quite possibly the worst draft moves we have made in a while. I understand the Ravens are division rivals breh, but damn you fucked us in this one.

 

Takk is more of a production by motor rather than a production by talent/technique type of player. He has upside, but he's not nearly as technical or as versatile as Anderson is. Conley was in consideration, but I figured that Ravens current CB group is strong enough to warrant passing on one.

 

Higgins is my #2 QB right now, and I couldn't continue to outweigh the value with the projected pick position anymore. I figured the Ravens are a great landing spot for him, as he would be a safety net for injuries to Joe, and could potentially be a future heir at the position.

 

Hunt was interesting, because while the Ravens have a shitload of running backs, most of them are essentially RB2 or RB3 caliber guys. I think Hunt could become the focal point for the Ravens, with Dixon and Woodhead behind him. Y'all need to move some backs though cause that group is mediocre and overcrowded. :p

 

I'm actually a Rams fan now, for the record, so don't consider it a divisional rival bias. The mock is just a combination of commonly accepted value (why I didn't go Higgins for someone R1), positional need, and my own evaluations and grading. Consider it a "Cherry plays GM" if you will.

Charles Harris in the 4th! Chern, we need to have a talk....

 

I have him as an average starter at 3-4 OLB. He isn't nearly as consistent as you'd like, and will have games where he gets absolutely blanked all day. I see some of the physical upside, but not enough to outweigh being a raw pass-rusher who doesn't generate pressure.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Round 5

 

1 (145). :Browns: Julie'n Davenport, OT, Bucknell

 

With Cameron Erving and Shon Coleman fighting for the right tackle spot, it makes sense to add some depth to the position. Davenport has the upside to be a starter, and while he isn't as physically powerful as Coleman, he is much more technical. He could win the starting job early on, although he likely won't be much more than an average player.

 

2 (146). :49ers: Cole Luke, CB, Notre Dame

 

I considered going offensive line here, but Cole Luke is a solid addition to the cornerback group in San Francisco, and could immediately get reps over guys like Keith Reaser. He's a much needed addition to a suffering secondary, at least on the outside.

 

3 (147). :Bears: Eddie Jackson, S, Alabama

 

Jackson falls to the fifth round here, and has the upside to be a starter in the NFL. He will likely start off as a returner on special teams, and generally just a reserve role on defense. That said, if he recovers well from his broken leg, he could take of the starting job from Demps down the road.

 

4 (148). :jags: Jordan Willis, DE, Kansas State

 

Willis blew up the combine, but he doesn't show anything that impressive on tape. He's a winner by motor, not by technique. He would do well to begin his career as a rotational pass-rusher who just focuses on getting after the quarterback. Sitting behind Fowler and Campbell in Jacksonville would be great for his development long-term.

 

5 (149). :Rams: JuJu Smith-Schuster, WR, USC

 

While Smith-Schuster might never develop to be much more than an average #2 receiver, he would help to immediately add depth to the Rams depleted WR corps. He's likely not going to start right away, but could see action over guys like Robert Woods if given time.

 

6 (150). :Jets: Amara Darboh, WR, Michigan

 

The selection was difficult here, as there were certainly guys with higher talent grades and more upside. However, the Jets need to continue to stockpile talent on offense to surround Kizer with, and Darboh becomes the #4 receiver immediately for the Jets. He certainly has a case to start over Charone Peake, as well.

 

7 (151). :Chargers: Elijah Hood, RB, North Carolina

 

The Chargers would do well to add a power run specialist to pair with Melvin Gordon. Hood is an old school runner who plays like a bowling ball when he is coming downhill. He bounces off tackles with ease, and while he doesn't have the best speed, he can make up for it with the ability to break tackles. Solid piece that compliments Melvin Gordon well.

 

8 (152). :panthers: Kendall Beckwith, LB, LSU

 

Beckwith may not be the most effective linebacker in coverage, but he can hold his own in the run game. He is a great backup to Kuechly, and could be a serviceable in the event of an injury somewhere in the linebacker group.

 

9 (153). :Bengals: Isaac Rochell, DE, Notre Dame

 

Rochell is a great example of a do-it-all 4-3 defensive end. He can hold his own in the run game, and has a few tricks up his sleeve in the pass game. He has prototypical size for he position, and while he is not a great athlete overall, he has an NFL caliber game. Potential starter down the road.

 

10 (154). :Redskins: Ryan Ramczyk, OT, Wisconsin

 

Ramczyk is rather raw, and will need some time to adjust if he is going to develop to succeed as more than a back-up. He has solid footwork, and has very good mobility for his size. However, he plays way too high and will get beat off the line of scrimmage on a consistent basis. This is the real area that would make Ramczyk a valuable selection.

 

11 (155). :Eagles: Brandon Bell, OLB, Penn State

 

Bell likely won't start barring injuries, but could develop into something down the road. For now he's a solid backup that will be able to hold the fort down in case of injury.

 

12 (156). :Bills: Calvin Munson, OLB, San Diego State

 

Munson could immediately starter over Humber as the Bills outside linebacker, and I wouldn't be shocked. He's not a sideline-to-sideline athlete, but can be used as a strong defender in the run game.

 

13 (157). :Cardinals: Cameron Tom, C, Southern Miss

 

Tom may not become an immediate starter of Shipley, but he has the upside to become the man in Arizona down the road largely due to the lack of talent from Shipley. He's not great in the run game, but has great lateral movement in the passing game.

 

14 (158). :Colts: Shalom Luani, S, Washington State

 

Luani is a starting caliber player who could be a very solid run defending safety. He isn't a freak athlete, and will be limited in the passing game, but when used in the box he has an impact coming downhill. He's likely going to become an immediate starter for the Colts over Andrew Williamson.

 

15 (159). :Ravens: Dylan Cole, ILB, Missouri State

 

Cole is one of the better inside linebackers in this class, and has all the physical upside to become a mid-level starter at the next level. While he likely never develops into a great player, he could be a good backup behind Mosley, and may even compete with Correa for the second ILB spot.

 

16 (160). :Vikings: Jeremiah Ledbetter, DT, Arkansas

 

If Floyd ends up walking away from football, Ledbetter might be thrust into action early if drafted by the Vikings. He's likely a below average starter, but could hold the fort down until the Vikings can find a better replacement in the future.

 

17 (161). :49ers: David Bright, OG, Stanford

 

Bright may not have the best physical skillset, but he is technical enough to hang around for a while as a backup. He's likely going to be stuck behind Joshua Garnett and Zane Beadles, but could be on the 49ers roster for some time. Good addition that could play if needed.

 

18 (162). :Bucs: Leon McQuay III, S, USC

 

McQuay may not be as fitted for the coverage game as he would be for the run game, but the Bucs are dying to get a solid safety in this draft, and McQuay could be a low end starter. He's worth taking at this point in the draft given the positional need.

 

19 (163). :Pats: Larry Ogunjobi, DT, Charlotte

 

Ogunjobi likely doesn't start for the Patriots, but he could develop into something down the road. He isn't a freak athlete, but he does a good job of generating pressure on the quarterback when given reps. He's a good investment to fill out the DT group in New England.

 

20 (164). :Titans: Fabian Moreau, CB, UCLA

 

Likely just a depth pick here, the Titans need to continue to bolster their cornerback group, and adding Moreau helps them significantly in that cause. He's a great upside prospect, and while he is pretty raw with his technique, he can become a starter down the line.

 

21 (165). :Lions: Josh Carraway, DE, TCU

 

Likely just a backup at the next level, Carraway has some traits that could warrant getting him reps as a pass-rusher. He is pretty much maxed out as an athlete, but could be a good depth addition.

 

22 (166). :dolphins: Vince Biegel, OLB, Wisconsin

 

Biegel likely takes the starting job from Hewitt, and becomes a low level starter for the Dolphins. He's not a great athlete, and will have serious limitations in coverage, but he should do fine as a stopgap until they can find someone better to put outside.

 

23 (167). :Giants: Chris Wormley, DE, Michigan

 

Wormley is huge for the position, and plays with great power. He is a bit inconsistent getting after the quarterback, but typically dominates the run game. He would be a great backup to JPP, and could become the starter down the line.

 

24 (168). :Raiders: Cordrea Tankersley, CB, Clemson

 

Tankersley is incredibly raw, and would need time to develop properly. He's likely not going to start in the slot due to his size and awkward footwork. This is the area where he should be considered in this draft, just because of the inconsistency in his game.

 

25 (169). :Texans: Hardy Nickerson Jr., ILB, Illinois

 

Nickerson is one of the better coverage inside linebackers in this class, and while he isn't a good enough athlete to keep up with guys from the slot, he can handle most coverage duties over the middle in zone. He's not a strong tackler, but has backup written all over him. Good depth piece.

 

27 (170). :Chiefs: Taysom Hill, QB, BYU

 

Hill is one of the more athletic prospects in this class at quarterback, and his game mirrors Alex Smith in a lot of ways, although he is not nearly as accurate on a consistent basis. He's a short game guy, and is excellent at working his way up the field if he has a running game to back him up. He should be a solid backup for some time for the Chiefs, assuming he doesn't have anymore injuries.

 

28 (171). :Bills: Khalfani Muhammad, RB, California

 

Muhammad will never get the lion's share of touches, but he is the fastest running back in this class. He ran in the low 4.3's in the rain on his pro day, and looks like he could hit 4.25 in the open field. He's not a big guy, and will likely only be used as a returner and home-run threat, but he would be a great addition to pair with LeSean McCoy.

 

29 (172). :Packers: D'onta Foreman, RB, Texas

 

Foreman needs to fall into the right situation to succeed, but that right situation could be there in Green Bay. He's not a guy who breaks tackles or does a lot of work on his own, but if he is given time and space he can put up good numbers. He's very similar to Ezekiel Elliott as a runner, and while he will go down often on first contact, he has immediate acceleration to top speed, and can pick up yardage in chunks. Could compete for starting job.

 

30 (173). :Steelers: Dante Barnett, S, Kansas State

 

The Steelers need to add more depth at safety, and Barnett could be a solid backup behind Sean Davis. He's not going to blow your mind in coverage, but has a solid all-aroun skillset that makes him worthy of a day three selection.

 

31 (174). :Falcons: Raekwon McMillan, ILB, Ohio State

 

While McMillan tested well at the combine, he has serious limitations in coverage. He plays way too stiff, and looks a lot like Benardrick McKinney in coverage. He should be a backup at the next level until he improves his talents in the passing game. However, all the tools are there for him to succeed.

 

32 (175). :Browns: DeAndre Scott, CB, Akron

 

The Browns still need help in their secondary, and the addition of DeAndre Scott makes their odds of defending a slot receiver much higher. Scott is great at pivoting quickly and breaking on the football. He's not a great tackler, but would do well as the Browns slot guy.

 

33 (176). :Bengals: Isaiah Ford, WR, Virginia Tech

 

Ford has WR2 upside for the Bengals, and could very well end up taking over the starting spot from LaFell and Boyd by the end of the season. He has serious speed to his game, and while he is undersized he can make plays on the football.

 

34 (177). :Broncos: Kofi Amichia, OT, USF

 

Amichia has great size and power for the position, and could become a starter down the line. He isn't as technical as you'd like coming out, but could make up for that with play strength.

 

35 (178). :dolphins: Fred Ross, WR, Mississippi State

 

Ross adds depth to a Dolphins receiving group that has Leonte Carroo as it's #4 guy. He's likely just a depth guy, but could see some action down the line if anyone gets taken out by injuries.

 

36 (179). :Cardinals: Rodney Adams, WR, USF

 

The Cardinals are in dire straits with the lack of receiving threats on the roster. Brittan Golden will not suffice, so the addition of Rodney Adams helps fill out the crew Palmer is working with.

 

37 (180). :Chiefs: Richard Levy, OG, Connecticut

 

Levy likely doesn't start over Ehinger, but would be a good addition for the Chiefs in terms of depth. He is a solid backup that could come in when needed.

 

38 (181). :Browns: Darius Hamilton, DE, Rutgers

 

Hamilton adds depth to the interior defensive line, and would be a solid backup to Jonathan Allen. He's likely not going to become a starter, but would serve as a good 3-5 year investment.

 

39 (182). :Packers: Chad Williams, WR, Grambling

 

It's never too late for the Packers to consider trying to find more weapons for Rodgers, and Williams has one of the highest upsides of any receiver in this class. He would be a great addition, and would likely come in as the Packers #5 receiver, although he could end up as their #4 guy by the end of the season. The potential is tremendous.

 

40 (183). :Pats: Garrett Sickels, DE, Penn State

 

Sickels isn't the most powerful athlete, but he has the upside in terms of technique to be worth adding to the team. He's likely going to buried on the depth chart for a while, but could develop into a very solid backup given time. He has the skills to be a spot starter or a backup for 5-7 years.

 

41 (184). :dolphins: Eric Wilson, OLB, Cincinnati

 

Wilson and Biegel would be fighting to the death for the starting outside linebacker spot in this situation, but the need for depth here is huge for the Dolphins. They can afford to take two guys to the same position and let them battle it out for whoever ends up deserving it. Wilson is a very capable cover LB.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Round 6

 

1 (185). :Browns: Joseph Yearby, RB, Miami

 

Yearby lost a lot of reps to Mark Walton in the Miami backfield, but he has the baseline athletic talent and vision to be a solid depth guy at the next level. He's like a committee back, but could get some action in the right group of backs.

 

2 (186). :Ravens: Brian Allen, CB, Utah

 

Allen isn't polished, but he has the physical tools to be successful at the next level. He's a good ballhawk, and has the range to make an impact. He's likely going to come in as CB4 for the Ravens.

 

3 (187). :jags: Eric Wilson, OLB, Cincinnati

 

Wilson adds depth to the Jags linebacker group, and would be a quality backup to Telvin Smith. He likely won't develop to be more than a depth guy, but could take over in an emergency.

 

4 (188). :Browns: Nate Gerry, S, Nebraska

 

Gerry is a good depth piece that will compete with Ibraheim Campbell for the backup safety spot behind Josh Jones in this scenario. He's not a great athlete, but plays with some fire to his game and would fit in well for a Cleveland defensive rebuild.

 

5 (189). :Rams: Aviante Collins, OT, TCU

 

The Rams still need depth on the offensive line, especially at tackle. Collins is one of the most athletic prospects in this class, and could be a starter down the road. He fits in well as a backup to Havenstein.

 

6 (190). :Chargers: Steven Moore, OT, California

 

Moore has prototypical size for the tackle position, and plays heavy. He's a solid backup, but likely won't ever become much more than that.

 

7 (191). :Jets: Jay Guillermo, C, Clemson

 

The Jets likely go center earlier than this if it weren't for the trade for Kizer. Guillermo likely starts over Wesley Johnson, but he's a low end starter at best. He doesn't have the technique to be successful long term at the position.

 

8 (192). :panthers: Zach Banner, OG, USC

 

Banner plays way too high to be an outside blocker, but he has great strength when he gets leverage. There are concerns about him playing too high due to his size, but he should be a solid backup in Carolina behind Trai Turner.

 

9 (193). :Bengals: Daeshon Hall, DE, Texas A&M

 

Hall isn't a physical freak, but has good bend for a late-round selection, and could end up seeing snaps down the road. He's not as powerful as most NFL defensive ends, but has a great motor that never stops.

 

10 (194). :Eagles: Kenneth Walker III, WR, UCLA

 

Walker has great speed, and could do damage immediately after the catch. He likely comes in as the #5 or #6 receiver for the Eagles, but he should make the roster in Philly.

 

11 (195). :Bills: Rasul Douglas, CB, West Virginia

 

Douglas has the upside to be a starter down the road, but he isn't polished enough with his footwork to have an immediate impact. He's good depth for the Bills, and could become their slot guy from the start.

 

12 (196). :Saints: Taco Charlton, DE, Michigan

 

Charlton isn't nearly as polished as he is hyped up to be, but he has prototypical size for the position and could become a starter down the road if he becomes much more refined with his technique. He's likely a steal here if you're a believer in his development.

 

13 (197). :Cardinals: Will Holden, OT, Vanderbilt

 

Holden isn't going to start for the Cardinals, but he is solid insurance if they lose Veldheer to injury. He is a decent technician, but lacks the top end strength to hold up against bigger guys.

 

14 (198). :49ers: Channing Stribling, CB, Michigan

 

While there is an argument that Jourdan Lewis is the better of the two, Stribling is much better in terms of physical upside, and has the range to take guys on one-on-one at the boundary. He's likely going to be a depth guy for the 49ers, but if the guys ahead of him struggle he could see action early.

 

15 (199). :Vikings: Adam Pankey, OG, West Virginia

 

Pankey is a solid run blocker, but doesn't have the all-around game to be a starter long term. He's just a depth player for the Vikings, and will sit behind Alex Boone.

 

16 (200). :Pats: Riley Bullough, ILB, Michigan State

 

Bullough is pretty limited in coverage, and will likely be stuck behind both Hightower and Van Noy on the depth chart. However, he should make the roster over Trevor Bates if the chopping block is set down on the MLB position group.

 

17 (201). :Redskins: Lucas Crowley, C, North Carolina

 

Crowley is pretty limited overall as an athlete, and won't be effective as a move piece for the offensive line. However, he has the strength and size to be good depth for the Redskins. He should be a backup to Spencer Long if he goes to Washington.

 

18 (202). :49ers: D.J. Jones, NT, Ole Miss

 

Jones may not immediately start over Earl Mitchell, but he is probably the second best nose tackle in this class. He plays a bit small, but he's disruptive and can find his way to the ball-carrier.

 

19 (203). :Broncos: Drew Morgan, WR, Arkansas

 

Morgan is one of the lesser athletes in this receiver group, but he has very good hands and typically runs good routes. He's very similar to Trent Taylor, but not nearly as polished. He should make the roster as the #6 receiver in Denver, though Bennie Fowler may make it difficult.

 

20 (204). :Bucs: Jourdan Lewis, CB, Michigan

 

Lewis is a solid depth addition for the Bucs, and could be an impact immediately due to a lack of depth in the cornerback group. He has the strength and size to succeed, but doesn't play strong. Way too inconsistent with footwork.

 

21 (205). :Lions: James Quick, WR, Louisville

 

Quick is one of the better upside picks in this class at receiver, and has solid footwork. He can play almost anywhere on your offense, and while he needs to be more consistent with his motor, he can be a solid future starter for Detroit.

 

22 (206). :dolphins: Montravius Adams, DT, Auburn

 

Adams could end up starting down the road, but he will likely be a backup to Suh to start his career. He isn't a freak athlete, but can generate power when he gets leverage.

 

23 (207). :Giants: Jhavon Williams, CB, Connecticut

 

Williams is a solid depth addition, and could end up taking the place of Antwon Blake as the fourth cornerback for the Giants. Regardless, he should make the roster.

 

24 (208). :Raiders: Kylie Fitts, DE, Utah

 

Fitts has solid athleticism, and would be a good backup to Mario Edwards. He's likely just a backup due to lack of overall talent, but could step in during a time of crisis.

 

25 (209). :Redskins: Christian Heyward, DE, San Diego State

 

Heyward would likely sit behind Dalvin Tomlinson in this situation, but could end up starting over Terrell McClain if given a truly open competition. He has the size to succeed at the next level, but doesn't demonstrate consistency with his technique.

 

 

26 (210). :Seahawks: Sam Rogers, FB, Virginia Tech

 

Rogers is a great blocker, and does a good job of clearing out guys for his running back. He's mobile, but hits with great force. He's likely the first fullback off the board, and round six to a team that loves the power run would be a great spot for him.

 

 

28 (211). :Seahawks: Skyler Howard, QB, West Virginia

 

Howard is very mobile for the position, and can make plays on the move. He throws with very solid zip on his passes, and can generate a lot of muscle behind his throws. He's likely not going to become a starter due to his height, but could be a solid backup for some time behind Wilson.

 

29 (212). :Packers: David Jones, S, Richmond

 

Jones isn't the greatest athlete, but he throws his weight behind his tackles and has baseline range to succeed at the next level. He's probably going to be the third best safety on the roster, but that could be enough to earn him some reps.

 

 

30 (213). :Steelers:Sean Harlow, OG, Oregon State

 

Harlow isn't a great mover, but he has the pass blocking strength to be a solid backup at the next level. He's going to get stuck behind DeCastro, but could prove himself if the opportunity opens due to injuries.

 

 

31 (214). :Titans: DeVon Edwards, S, Duke

 

Edwards has the overall game to be worth taking, but he plays a bit undersized for the position. That lack of size will keep him from being more than a depth guy in his career, but his technical skills could get him a shot on special teams.

 

 

32 (215). :Lions: Zay Jones, WR, East Carolina

 

Jones has the size to win himself reps, but he doesn't play with great footwork and drops too many passes to be a good starter at the next level. He has upside, and could end up taking over down the road for Jones or Tate as an outside receiver.

 

 

33 (216). :Chiefs: Carlos Henderson, WR, Louisiana Tech

 

Carlos Henderson is a physical receiver who does a good job of fighting his way through contact for extra yards, but he plays slow and will struggle at times to get separation. When you work him into an offense that gets him the ball, he could find the success. However, if you expect him to naturally get touches you're mistaken.

 

 

34 (217). :Bengals: Greg Pyke, OG, Georgia

 

Pyke doesn't have any huge assets that he brings, but he has the all-around athletic ability and technique to be a solid depth player. He would likely just sit the bench behind Westerman.

 

 

35 (218). :Chiefs: Darrell Brown, OT, Louisiana Tech

 

Brown is a bit sloppy at times with his technique, but he has solid pop and run strength. He's going to be stuck behind Donald Stephenson, but could hang around for several years.

Edited by Chernobyl420

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Round 7

 

1 (219). :49ers: Michael Roberts, TE, Toledo

 

Roberts steps in immediately as the second best tight end in San Francisco. He's inconsistent with his hands, but has great size and athleticism. He's probably going to be a better blocker than Vance McDonald.

 

2 (220). :Redskins: Storm Norton, OT, Toledo

 

Norton has solid size and strength, and is a mover in the run game. He's able to bully guys around with his length. He's a solid backup to Morgan Moses, but he will definitely bring competition to the position.

 

 

3 (221). :Bears: Ryan Melton, OT, Texas State

 

Melton is a solid piece as a pass blocker, but will likely just end up as a backup for the Bears if he goes to Chicago. Leno might keep one eye open at night, though, as he isn't too far behind.

 

 

4 (222). :jags: Evan Goodman, OT, Arizona State

 

He's a solid backup behind Branden Albert, and does a good job of holding his own in the run game. He's a bit sluggish as a pass blocker, but the potential to be on an NFL roster for several years is there.

 

5 (223). :dolphins: Nick Callendar, OT, Colorado State

 

Callendar is a bit slow as a mover, but has the technique to be a backup at the next level. He'd sit well behind Tunsil.

 

6 (224). :Jets: Buck Cowan, TE, Idaho

 

Cowan is a very solid move piece in the passing game, and will find his way into the open to make plays. He doesn't have great blocking skills, but could hold up to become a starter in the NFL, especially in a weak Jets group.

 

7 (225). :Chargers: Brady Gustafson, QB, Montana

 

Gustafson doesn't have great arm talent, but he plays smart with the football and has a very clean throwing motion. He's likely going to be a backup long term in the NFL, but could be an emergency starter.

 

8 (226). :Seahawks: Deatrich Wise Jr., DE, Arkansas

 

Wise isn't a great technician, but has solid bend to do damage around the edge. He's likely a situational pass-rusher or a backup at the next level, but could end up sticking around on the roster for the entirety of his first contract.

 

9 (227). :Bengals: Tau Lotulelei, OLB, Utah

 

Lotulelei doesn't have anything but backup potential, but could serve out the entirety of his first contract as a backup to Flowers.

 

10 (228). :Cowboys: Marcus Rios, CB, UCLA

 

Rios isn't the greatest athlete, but does well around the boundary in coverage. He is likely just a depth guy, but could make the roster.

 

11 (229). :Saints: Ikaika Woolsey, QB, Hawaii

 

Woolsey is incredibly underrated, and could be the third QB for the Saints. While Chase Daniel is a solid backup, the Saints need to add some youth to their QB group. Woolsey is accurate on short and intermediate passes, and has the speed to run the ball. He needs developed, and doesn't have the world's greatest arm, but could be a good emergency backup.

 

12 (230). :Eagles: Harvey Langi, ILB, BYU

 

Langi isn't great in coverage, but tackles well and could be a solid backup in Philly. He's compact and explosive when he's coming downhill.

 

13 (231). :Cardinals: Jordan Leggett, TE, Clemson

 

Leggett isn't a great athlete, and has struggles at times with getting involved as a receiver, but he has the overall game to be worth a late pick. He's a solid backup.

 

14 (232). :Vikings: Bucky Hodges, TE, Virginia Tech

 

Hodges might be a better fit at receiver, as he doesn't have great blocking skills, but he has towering size and receiving ability. His hands are inconsistent at times, but he is one of the better receiving TEs in this class.

 

15 (233). :panthers: Viliami Moeakiola, S, Arizona State

 

Moeakiola is one of the safety lineabcker hybrids that has come out in recent years, and he could arguably play at either spot. He's bad at getting flat feet in coverage, and would likely contribute the most an in-the-box safety who doesn't need to do anything in the open field.

 

16 (234). :Rams: Quincy Adeboyejo, WR, Ole Miss

 

Adeboyejo is a bit sluggish at times with his route-running, but has good hands and can find his way into the open with his size and vertical ability. He's likely a depth guy at most, but could find some action.

 

17 (235). :Redskins: Mitch Leidner, QB, Minnesota

 

Leidner fits the bill for the Redskins as a late round selection. He's a smart short-to-intermediate passer, but gets way too inconsistent with his accuracy and decision-making. Low upside pick that puts pressure on Colt McCoy.

 

18 (236). :Titans: Derek Rivers, OLB, Youngstown State

 

Rivers isn't a freak athlete that he gets hyped up to be, and mostly dominated weaker competition in the FCS. However, he does have the traits to be a solid backup at the next level. He'd be a good fit for the Titans as a late-round selection.

 

19 (237). :Bucs: Davis Webb, QB, California

 

Davis Webb has the arm strength to be a starter at the next level, but is way too inconsistent with his mechanics and decision-making. He's typically accurate despite his odd throwing motion, but the footwork needs reworked. He's a project, but one with ridiculous potential.

 

20 (238). :Broncos: Jeremy Clark, CB, Michigan

 

Clark is probably the least talented of the three declared Michigan corners, but he has solid athleticism. He's a good depth addition for the Broncos, and could work his way from the practice squad to the real roster.

 

21 (239). :Pats: Shane Callahan, OG, Colorado

 

Callahan is a pretty average package all-around, but has the pass-blocking technique to be a good depth addition for the Patriots. He's going to be a backup at the next level, but could serve out his entire contract for the Patriots.

 

22 (240). :dolphins: Terence Waugh, DE, Kent State

 

Waugh has solid bend and technique, but will likely be relegated to the back of the roster. He could end up being relegated to the practice squad, but will likely end up making it onto the 53.

 

23 (241). :Giants: Nyeem Wartman-White, OLB, Penn State

 

Wartman-White is a solid run stuffer, and could be a good backup long term for the Giants. He could compete for the starter job if Thomas or Kennard struggle at all.

 

 

24 (242). :Raiders: Greg Mabin, CB, Iowa

 

Mabin isn't the greatest athlete, but plays well in zone and could be a solid depth piece for the Raiders. He played second fiddle to Desmond King at Iowa, but is a serviceable corner in his own right.

 

25 (243). :Texans: Charles Walker, DE, Oklahoma

 

Walker is a solid interior defensive lineman who brings decent pass-rushing skills to the table. He isn't consistent with his motor, and has some character concerns, but the talent is certainly there to be a late-round selection.

 

26 (244). :Raiders: Travis Rudolph, WR, Florida State

 

Rudolph doesn't have great speed over the middle of the field, but can showcase good playmaking skills as a slot receiver. He's likely just a depth guy for the Raiders, but could be a factor if some injuries occur.

 

27 (245). :Chiefs: Danny O'Brien, NT, Tennessee

 

O'Brien is more of a big body than anything for the position, and the off-the-field concerns will have him at risk of not getting drafted. That said, he is one of the few nose tackles in this class with starter potential down the line, and fills up space very well.

 

28 (246). :Cowboys: Malachi Dupre, WR, LSU

 

Dupre does his best work as a blocker, but struggles to get separation in the receiving game. He's likely going to be stuck at the back of the group as a receiver, and will mostly be relegated to special teams. He's a solid addition that could contribute in the dirtier parts of the game.

 

29 (247). :Packers: Mike Tyson, S, Cincinnati

 

Tyson is a solid run-stuffing safety, but he doesn't have the coverage skills to do much in the passing game. He's a good backup for the Packers, but likely won't develop much beyond that.

 

30 (248). :Steelers: Paul Boyette Jr., DE, Texas

 

Boyette would fit well for the Steelers, and would likely be the third DE on his side of the field. He's likely going to be fighting for a roster spot, but there is a good chance he gets it.

 

31 (249). :Falcons: Jon Toth, C, Kentucky

 

Toth is way too slow in the run game, and will struggle if he is asked to pull around the formation. He's likely going to just be a long-term backup behind Alex Mack, although a better player could supplant him on the 53-man roster.

 

32 (250). :Lions: Tanoh Kpassagnon, DE, Villanova

 

Kpassagnon is one of the highest potential picks in the later rounds, and his size is intriguing. He has the size to play both inside and outside, although he needs to develop quite a bit if he is ever going to develop into anything more than a solid backup.

 

33 (251). :Bengals: Gabe Marks, WR, Washington State

 

Marks has the potential to be a solid WR4 or WR5, but could end up being relegated to the practice squad for the Bengals. He doesn't have the upside to be much more than a depth guy.

 

34 (252). :Broncos: Marquel Lee, LB, Wake Forest

 

Lee is a solid tackler, but nothing special. He's likely going to be relegated to backup duty for the Broncos, and could get replaced soon by better players. However, he is worth the pick to solidify depth.

 

35 (253). :Broncos: Christian McCaffrey, RB, Stanford

 

McCaffrey isn't a great runner, but he has the skills as a pass-catcher to earn his spot on the roster. He could end up being converted to wide receiver, and would be a good addition for the Broncos. It was between him or Tyus Bowser here, and the versatility of McCaffrey gets him the nod as Mr. Irrelevant.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Reminder:

 

1. I'm making these selections purely as a combination of my talent grade, perceived value, and positional need.

 

McCaffrey is a slot receiver/committee back hybrid who can't accelerate. Bowser is an undersized pass rusher who has zero technique to his game. Both graded out as 3.8 which means potential backup.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Chatbox

    Load More
    You don't have permission to chat.
×